The Nancy Sever Gallery is pleased to present RIEDELBAUCH | AMESBURY | GEORGE, an exhibition of the work of three Canberra based artists who apply their imagination and creativity to exploring the possibilities of their chosen medium.

Gilbert Riedelbauch works as a contemporary designer/maker using a variety of materials and processes. He has a particular interest in combining digital technologies with traditional metal working techniques and the integration of digital fabrication with traditional ways of making. His works include public art projects such as the 'Coat of Arms' at the Canberra Magistrates Court, sculptural objects based on mathematical equations, Light objects using LEDs and, more recently, folded forms using composite aluminium.

Avi Amesbury’s work explores the multi-layered and intricate relationships between place, experience and memory. She uses materials collected from the land, such as clay and volcanic ash, and mark making to explore her place within the Australian landscape.

Mel George looks to give form and permanence to the intangibility of time - the impression of both its impending and passing presence. She represents familiar structures and systems employed in our everyday to mark, record, plan and chart our time, such as calendars and in this case, weekly layouts. She opts to omit the usual text that would typically be added to each of these items. Instead, she fills the available space with coloured swatches that use variation and vibrancy of hues to harmonise the sense of the situation within each swatch. Glass allows her to present these abstract narratives and archetypically ephemeral daily acts as visually soft immersive fields that give rigid preservation and permanence.

GILBERT RIEDELBAUCH

Gilbert Riedelbauch has been based in Canberra since 1992. He  is as a Designer/Maker working with variety of materials and processes. He holds qualifications from the Australian National University and the Akademie der Bildenden Künste Nürnberg, Germany. He exhibits his work nationally and internationally.

His awards include the coveted Bayerischer Staatspreis: Meister der Moderne (2002), Germany and a national teaching award for his contribution to university teaching, a Carrick Citation (2007). He is the Postgraduate Coursework convener and the head of Foundation Studies at the School of Art, Australian National University, Canberra.

The current body of works is created through the combination of digital technologies with traditional metal working techniques and the integration of digital fabrication with traditional ways of making.  The designs are guided by his interest in finding and giving form through stressing surfaces. These stresses are controlled by lines engraved with the help of a computer numerically controlled (CNC) router. Following fundamental geometric principles, these lines predetermine the resulting topology of the object.

 

Gilbert Riedelbauch | Works included in the exhibition:

(for details of the works, please hold cursor over the image)

AVI AMESBURY

Avi Amesbury’s work explores the multi-layered and intricate relationships between place, experience and memory. She uses materials collected from the land, such as clay and volcanic ash, and mark making to explore her place within the Australian landscape.

Avi Amesbury | Works included in the exhibition:

(for details of the works, please hold cursor over the image)

Avi Amesbury's biographical details

MEL GEORGE

Mel George looks to give form and permanence to the intangibility of time - the impression of both its impending and passing presence. She represents familiar structures and systems employed in our everyday to mark, record, plan and chart our time, such as calendars and in this case, weekly layouts. She opts to omit the usual text that would typically be added to each of these items. Instead, she fills the available space with coloured swatches that use variation and vibrancy of hues to harmonise the sense of the situation within each swatch. The glass allows her to present these abstract narratives and archetypically ephemeral daily acts as visually soft immersive fields that give rigid preservation and permanence.

 

Mel George | Works included in the exhibition:

(for details of the works, please hold cursor over the image)